ConnectingWomen

 

Short Game Essentials

Practice your short game to improve your scores.

The quickest way to see immediate improvement in your golf scores is to practice the short game.  Golfers know this and yet most people don’t practice chipping, pitching, bunker shots or putting like they should.  The general rule of thumb is to practice 50 percent of the time on these areas.  

Part of practicing the short game is to know the difference between a chip shot and a pitch shot and when to use them.  For a chip shot, the ball stays low to the ground so it’s a great shot when you want to land the ball on the green and have it roll to the hole.

To hit a chip shot, use a wedge or short iron and play the ball closer to your back foot (right foot for right-handed golfers, left foot for left-handed golfers).  You want your weight more on your front foot with your club shaft and hands pressed slightly forward.  Make a short back and through motion and you will feel the ball “pop” off the clubface.  The back of your lead hand (left hand for right-handed players) finishes toward your target.  The club head stays below your hands and finishes low to the ground.

Here are some Chipping secrets:

  • Weight forward
  • Ball back of center in stance
  • Club selection - not as much loft (pitch shots have more loft)
  • Small motion, like sweeping in a dust pan (swing motion wouldn’t go in pan)
  • Club runs into the ball
  • Back of lead hand must finish first (flat wrist)
  • Club head finishes low to the ground
  • Ball has low trajectory

Learn and own a 50-yard shot – it’s imperative for women to get great at it.  You will be amazed how the increased confidence will carry over to other areas of your swing and game.  Even if you play with golfers who hit the ball farther than you do, once you get comfortable with the 50-yard shot, you will score better with your new and improved short game.

To escape from the bunker in one shot, use a sand wedge or lofted club with some bounce.  (Bounce is an angle measurement in degrees, of how much the sole of the club head lifts the leading edge.)  Bounce is what helps the club glide through the sand to help get the ball up and out of the bunker.  Start by opening your stance so you are lined up just left of your intended target and have your weight on your forward foot.  (Just like when hitting a pitch shot, this helps you avoid the tendency to want to “lift” the ball out of the bunker. 

Open the clubface and swing out to in through the sand, hitting about an inch or two behind the ball.  Be sure to accelerate through the swing and follow-through to the target.  Many times golfers stop swinging at the ball as soon as they hit the sand.  The key to getting the ball out on the first attempt is to swing to the target.  By hitting behind the ball, the sand forces the ball out of the bunker – the club head never really hits the ball.

Practice these short game shots and you will have increased confidence and lower scores.